World Cup 2022 | Team New Zealand | Complete Squad Analysis | SWOT


Written By: Ritwika Dhar, Jeet Vachharajani
Date: 02-03-2022

Picture Courtesy: Cricket Queens

BRIEF HISTORY

  • New Zealand last hosted the 50-over World Cup in 2000 and emerged as the winners
  • New Zealand legend Debbie Hockley is the all-time highest run-scorer (1,501 runs) in the World Cup
  • Suzie Bates has an average of 61.6 in the ODI World Cup which is the best amongst the current players
  • Amongst current players, Bates also has scored the most no. of centuries in the World Cups - 3

Previous World Cup Appearances: 1973, 1978, 1982, 1988, 1993, 1997, 2000, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2017
Best Finish: Winner - 2000

CURRENT FORM

  • Lost all their bilateral series in 2021
  • Finished at the 6th position in ICC ODI Championship 2017-2020
  • Just before the World Cup, they thrashed India by 4-1 in the ODI bilateral series
  • Amelia Kerr showcased an amazing all-round performance of 353 runs, 7 wickets, and a record-breaking 9 catches in those 5 matches 
  • New Zealand’s all batters and bowlers are in great touch. They have been able to shrug off the rustiness and clicking as a unit

STRENGTHS

A never-ending tail: Out of the 15 White Ferns picked for the World Cup squad, 14 of them can bat. This hasn’t happened naturally, there has been a lot of hard work that has taken place behind the scenes. The emphasis was placed on the bowlers getting better with the bat and this hard work has certainly paid off. The likes of Rosemary Mair can bat, Lea Tahuhu can smack it, Hannah Rowe has the power game and technique, Jess Kerr can hit from Ball 1. They have it all covered.

Late-order hitting: The likes of Lea Tahuhu and Jess Kerr will never have fixed batting slots. They will come in as and when needed to be utilized as pinch-hitters. They have taken the bull by the horns and changed the momentum of the innings several times. While Jess has already made the impression, Tahuhu is just getting started!

Emergence of Amelia Kerr - The All-rounder: Amelia Kerr’s skill levels as a player are growing quicker than her age. At just the age of 21, she holds some of the most staggering records. The Super Smash was a breakthrough season for her at the #3 position, and she has converted it well to the ODIs. Before the series against India, Amelia had never batted at the #3 position in the ODIs. By the end of the series, she had 353 runs in 5 games at an average of 118 with four 50+ scores. The warm-up against Australia saw her score 92* against a top-quality attack when chasing a very high total. With the ball, she continues to play a vital role and be the leader of the spin attack. But, this is not where it all ends as far as her utility is concerned. She is a gun fielder too with safe hands. She has been fielding at the hot spots and the ball somehow finds the way to reach her and she doesn’t falter so often.

Stellar top 4: New Zealand ditched their old plan of opening with Lauren Down or Maddy Green and have taken the aggressive route of opening with Sophie Devine, who has an excellent record as an opener in the ODIs. This has meant a top 4 of Suzie Bates (135 ODIs), Sophie Devine (121 ODIs), Amelia Kerr (46 ODIs), & Amy Satterthwaite (138 ODIs), a combined experience of 440 ODIs and 13211 runs. They are only one of the two teams alongside Australia to have their top 4 with such an incredible amount of experience.

WEAKNESSES

Chinks in the pace attack: While the likes of Jess Kerr and Lea Tahuhu are putting in consistent performances with the ball, the lack of it continues with Hayley Jensen and Hannah Rowe. Jensen’s economy has been well over 5 in the last 4 years as she has struggled to contain runs and all this with an average of 41. Rowe’s been no different with an economy of 5.5 in the last 4 years and an average of 35.5.

Reliance on pinch-hitters: Whenever New Zealand is in a need of upping the ante, they have started resorting to Jess Kerr and Lea Tahuhu. The reason why this is happening is that the middle-order batters in Maddy Green, Brooke Halliday, & Frances Mackay are all slow starters who need some time on the crease before they start attacking. Halliday, in particular, has a very limited range of hitting as she targets the off-side more often than not. The fact that Lauren Down has been ruled out of the World Cup comes as a body blow considering the form she was in.

OPPORTUNITIES

Selecting Mair for impact in the PP: With the struggles being evident with the new ball bowling, Mair is a perfect go-to option for New Zealand to implement if the likes of Jensen and Rowe continue to struggle. Mair has the ability to swing and seam the ball both ways and has a massive potential to cause destruction with the new ball.

THREATS

Fatigue factor: While the general talk of New Zealand having the advantage of coming on the back of an entire domestic season is making rounds, one must not forget that it could cause fatigue on the flip side. These players have been playing for a while in the HBJ Shield and the Super Smash after which they played the India series and this could eventually lead to burn out which the New Zealand management must look to avoid.

KEY PLAYERS

Amelia Kerr: Kerr is in the form of her life. She was the 2nd highest run-scorer in the Super Smash and she continued that form into the ODI series against India. She provides an incredible all-round value and she will be the most important player for the White Ferns with a potential shot at the Player of the Tournament award.


Sophie Devine: Devine is back as an opener and the impact has been seen straightaway. The skipper has her plans very clear. She opens and looks to make the most in the PP, and then also chips in with the ball. Her knock in the warm-up against Australia of 161* comes as an open warning to all the teams.


Suzie Bates: Suzie Bates is back and back with a bang! After having struggled for consistency and form over the last few years, she has rediscovered herself to finish as the leading run-scorer in Super Smash. Bates scored a ton in the very first ODI against India. She has been everywhere and one must not forget her contributions as a fielder. She is one of the safest catches of the ball as well.


Amy Satterthwaite: Amy Satterthwaite is a champion player. She has a plethora of experience and becomes a key player in this New Zealand setup. Her record in home games is quite amazing. She averages 51.0 in home games as compared to 31.2 in away games.

Lea Tahuhu: Lea Tahuhu will be the key player in both facets. She has transformed her game with the bat massively and one must keep an eye on her hitting. Besides, she will continue to be vital with the ball. That slingy action generates late movement off the pitch and batters will have to be very of not getting those outside edges or chopping it back onto the stumps.

Jess Kerr: She will be the most important new-ball bowler for New Zealand to resort to for early wickets in the PP. The hooping swing that she gets is something that many batters are not accustomed to facing. She is a smart operator like Megan Schutt. Both can hoop the ball back in, but use the leg-cutters to move it away. One must also be wary of her aggressive batting and striking ability.

Likely starting XI: Suzie Bates, Sophie Devine (c), Amelia Kerr, Amy Satterthwaite (Vc), Maddy Green, Brooke Halliday, Katey Martin (Wk), Lea Tahuhu, Hayley Jensen/Frances Mackay, Jess Kerr, Hannah Rowe

*All stats put up graphically are as on the date when posted on our Twitter account.
*For the complete schedule of the World Cup, check out the Schedule section of our page, Cricket Queens. World Cup Fixtures


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World Cup 2022 | Team New Zealand | Complete Squad Analysis | SWOT


Written By: Ritwika Dhar, Jeet Vachharajani
Date: 02-03-2022

Picture Courtesy: Cricket Queens

BRIEF HISTORY

  • New Zealand last hosted the 50-over World Cup in 2000 and emerged as the winners
  • New Zealand legend Debbie Hockley is the all-time highest run-scorer (1,501 runs) in the World Cup
  • Suzie Bates has an average of 61.6 in the ODI World Cup which is the best amongst the current players
  • Amongst current players, Bates also has scored the most no. of centuries in the World Cups - 3

Previous World Cup Appearances: 1973, 1978, 1982, 1988, 1993, 1997, 2000, 2005, 2009, 2013, 2017
Best Finish: Winner - 2000

CURRENT FORM

  • Lost all their bilateral series in 2021
  • Finished at the 6th position in ICC ODI Championship 2017-2020
  • Just before the World Cup, they thrashed India by 4-1 in the ODI bilateral series
  • Amelia Kerr showcased an amazing all-round performance of 353 runs, 7 wickets, and a record-breaking 9 catches in those 5 matches 
  • New Zealand’s all batters and bowlers are in great touch. They have been able to shrug off the rustiness and clicking as a unit

STRENGTHS

A never-ending tail: Out of the 15 White Ferns picked for the World Cup squad, 14 of them can bat. This hasn’t happened naturally, there has been a lot of hard work that has taken place behind the scenes. The emphasis was placed on the bowlers getting better with the bat and this hard work has certainly paid off. The likes of Rosemary Mair can bat, Lea Tahuhu can smack it, Hannah Rowe has the power game and technique, Jess Kerr can hit from Ball 1. They have it all covered.

Late-order hitting: The likes of Lea Tahuhu and Jess Kerr will never have fixed batting slots. They will come in as and when needed to be utilized as pinch-hitters. They have taken the bull by the horns and changed the momentum of the innings several times. While Jess has already made the impression, Tahuhu is just getting started!

Emergence of Amelia Kerr - The All-rounder: Amelia Kerr’s skill levels as a player are growing quicker than her age. At just the age of 21, she holds some of the most staggering records. The Super Smash was a breakthrough season for her at the #3 position, and she has converted it well to the ODIs. Before the series against India, Amelia had never batted at the #3 position in the ODIs. By the end of the series, she had 353 runs in 5 games at an average of 118 with four 50+ scores. The warm-up against Australia saw her score 92* against a top-quality attack when chasing a very high total. With the ball, she continues to play a vital role and be the leader of the spin attack. But, this is not where it all ends as far as her utility is concerned. She is a gun fielder too with safe hands. She has been fielding at the hot spots and the ball somehow finds the way to reach her and she doesn’t falter so often.

Stellar top 4: New Zealand ditched their old plan of opening with Lauren Down or Maddy Green and have taken the aggressive route of opening with Sophie Devine, who has an excellent record as an opener in the ODIs. This has meant a top 4 of Suzie Bates (135 ODIs), Sophie Devine (121 ODIs), Amelia Kerr (46 ODIs), & Amy Satterthwaite (138 ODIs), a combined experience of 440 ODIs and 13211 runs. They are only one of the two teams alongside Australia to have their top 4 with such an incredible amount of experience.

WEAKNESSES

Chinks in the pace attack: While the likes of Jess Kerr and Lea Tahuhu are putting in consistent performances with the ball, the lack of it continues with Hayley Jensen and Hannah Rowe. Jensen’s economy has been well over 5 in the last 4 years as she has struggled to contain runs and all this with an average of 41. Rowe’s been no different with an economy of 5.5 in the last 4 years and an average of 35.5.

Reliance on pinch-hitters: Whenever New Zealand is in a need of upping the ante, they have started resorting to Jess Kerr and Lea Tahuhu. The reason why this is happening is that the middle-order batters in Maddy Green, Brooke Halliday, & Frances Mackay are all slow starters who need some time on the crease before they start attacking. Halliday, in particular, has a very limited range of hitting as she targets the off-side more often than not. The fact that Lauren Down has been ruled out of the World Cup comes as a body blow considering the form she was in.

OPPORTUNITIES

Selecting Mair for impact in the PP: With the struggles being evident with the new ball bowling, Mair is a perfect go-to option for New Zealand to implement if the likes of Jensen and Rowe continue to struggle. Mair has the ability to swing and seam the ball both ways and has a massive potential to cause destruction with the new ball.

THREATS

Fatigue factor: While the general talk of New Zealand having the advantage of coming on the back of an entire domestic season is making rounds, one must not forget that it could cause fatigue on the flip side. These players have been playing for a while in the HBJ Shield and the Super Smash after which they played the India series and this could eventually lead to burn out which the New Zealand management must look to avoid.

KEY PLAYERS

Amelia Kerr: Kerr is in the form of her life. She was the 2nd highest run-scorer in the Super Smash and she continued that form into the ODI series against India. She provides an incredible all-round value and she will be the most important player for the White Ferns with a potential shot at the Player of the Tournament award.


Sophie Devine: Devine is back as an opener and the impact has been seen straightaway. The skipper has her plans very clear. She opens and looks to make the most in the PP, and then also chips in with the ball. Her knock in the warm-up against Australia of 161* comes as an open warning to all the teams.


Suzie Bates: Suzie Bates is back and back with a bang! After having struggled for consistency and form over the last few years, she has rediscovered herself to finish as the leading run-scorer in Super Smash. Bates scored a ton in the very first ODI against India. She has been everywhere and one must not forget her contributions as a fielder. She is one of the safest catches of the ball as well.


Amy Satterthwaite: Amy Satterthwaite is a champion player. She has a plethora of experience and becomes a key player in this New Zealand setup. Her record in home games is quite amazing. She averages 51.0 in home games as compared to 31.2 in away games.

Lea Tahuhu: Lea Tahuhu will be the key player in both facets. She has transformed her game with the bat massively and one must keep an eye on her hitting. Besides, she will continue to be vital with the ball. That slingy action generates late movement off the pitch and batters will have to be very of not getting those outside edges or chopping it back onto the stumps.

Jess Kerr: She will be the most important new-ball bowler for New Zealand to resort to for early wickets in the PP. The hooping swing that she gets is something that many batters are not accustomed to facing. She is a smart operator like Megan Schutt. Both can hoop the ball back in, but use the leg-cutters to move it away. One must also be wary of her aggressive batting and striking ability.

Likely starting XI: Suzie Bates, Sophie Devine (c), Amelia Kerr, Amy Satterthwaite (Vc), Maddy Green, Brooke Halliday, Katey Martin (Wk), Lea Tahuhu, Hayley Jensen/Frances Mackay, Jess Kerr, Hannah Rowe

*All stats put up graphically are as on the date when posted on our Twitter account.
*For the complete schedule of the World Cup, check out the Schedule section of our page, Cricket Queens. World Cup Fixtures


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